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Archive for August, 2011

Genealogists are eagerly awaiting the release of the 1940 U.S. Federal Census in April 2012 so we can track down the information on all of our relatives. While Ancestry will have the images available for free, they will probably not be indexed for some time. For me, this isn’t necessarily a bad thing…my family’s track record for being recorded and indexed correctly is 5 out of 19 attempts from 1900 through 1930. Of the 14 entries that have incorrect spellings, 8 could be found via Soundex. That left 6 families that had to be found using other search methods. These 19 only include the surnames of my four grandparents – if I added in siblings of great-grandparents and grandparents with different surnames, the error count would be even higher. Here’s a look at how my family’s names fared in census indexing so far:

The Bergmeister Family

I have a lot of entries for the Bergmeister’s. First, he’s my only great-grandparent to be enumerated on the 1900 Census having just arrived to the U.S. in time. While neither he nor his wife are still alive for the 1930 Census, their two adult sons and one daughter have their own households by then. Also, my great-grandfather had a brother who is enumerated in 1910, and his widow takes over as head of the household for 1920 and 1930. Of the nine households total, only 3 were correct: Joseph Bergmeister in 1900 and 1910, and his son Joseph Bergmeister in 1930. Fortunately, no matter how creatively the name was spelled, it managed to show up in the Soundex most of the time.

Year Person Spelling Soundex
1910 Ignatz Berzminster N
1920 Joseph Burgmaster Y
1920 Theresa Birgmister Y
1930 Theresa Burgmeister Y
1930 Max Bergmuset Y
1930 Marie Bergmeistor Y

The Pater Family

I’m always amazed that a name like “Pater” could be misspelled so often. I mean, Pointkouski I can see, but Pater? There are only four instances of my Pater family in the census: Joseph Pater in 1910, 1920, and 1930 and his son Louis with his own household in 1930. At least they got it right half of the time!

Year Spelling Soundex
1910 Potter Y
1930 Rater N

The Zawodny Family

My great-grandfather Joseph Zawodny is in the 1910, 1920, and 1930 Census as well. However, you’ll only find him using a Soundex search in 1930 due to the rather creative spellings of his name.

Year Spelling Soundex
1910 Savonia N
1920 Cawodny N
1930 Zavodny Y

The Piontkowski Family

The Piontkowski’s were also in the U.S. for the 1910 through 1930 Census. I can’t tell you how long it took me to find them in 1910 – you’ll see why by the spelling shown below.

Year Spelling Soundex
1910 Kilkuskie N
1920 Pontdowke N
1930 Peontkowski Y

By 1940, only 3 of my great-grandparents are deceased. Both sets of grandparents are married, and it will be my parents’ first appearance on a federal census record! And many of the siblings of my grandparents and their cousins will have households of their own. No index? No problem! I’m already gathering the information that will help me find them in the 1940 Census: addresses! By using sources such as social security applications, draft registration cards, death certificates, city directories, and the 1930 address I should be able to get a fairly accurate idea of the various residences in 1940. I also intend to use Steve Morse’s site to determine the enumeration district (ED) where I need to begin my search. See his page on finding the ED based on 1930 addresses, or take the quiz! I can’t wait to see how all of my family names are misspelled in 1940!

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Presenting the 3rd annual Festival of Strange Search Terms that have brought visitors to this blog.  In the spirit of August 2009’s What Are They Looking For? and December 2010’s What Are They Looking For? Redux, it was time to once again review those bizarre phrases that people enter into search engines.  Well, the phrases alone may be bizarre, but what’s more bizarre is that they wind up here as a result.  This is a mere sampling, but here are some of the best of the strange, odd, and unusual search terms that have brought visitors here in 2011 – with my comments, of course! Note: these are actual search terms used!

Genealogy Related…Sort Of

i forgot my name – I’m not sure I can help you with that.

can i have my great great grandmothers gene – If she is really your great-great grandmother, then you should have a couple of her genes.

gradma [sic] roulette – I’m not sure if this is about Grandma playing roulette, or…?

joey tempest is he married?  have a child? – Is this an ex? Is this a jealous ex? And does Google really answer questions like these?

how do i title a photo with my children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren in it – My Family

what is polish name for fred – Fred.  No, really!

 Vague Searches

where was my family from? – Perhaps you should see Steve Morse’s Finding Your Great-Grandfather in One Step

italian girl that immigrated teenager – I’d suggest a slightly more specific search parameter.

how to find family who lived a hundred years ago – Are you hoping to find the actual family now or just evidence of their existence back then?

Make Me LOL

family tree of first miller immigrant to new york – If only it were that easy!

how to bring old family pictures back to life – This reminds me of a bad ‘70s horror movie where the pictures come to life.

why cake misspelling so common – I have no idea, but now I want to know why…

baptist ladies “from left” – “All the Baptist ladies, all the Baptist ladies…”  What about those from the right?

sons that can not separate from mothers – Run.  Trust me on this one.

Really?

map of were [sic] most of germans live in GermanyWirklich?

adults in an unusual facial expression in an unusual situation – I don’t even want to know.

dumb mistakes – I try to only publicize my dumb genealogical mistakes here, so you won’t find all of my dumb mistakes.

christmas 1966 or 1967 or 1968 or 1969 or 1970 or 1971 “family photos” – or something…

winter blizzard humor – There is nothing funny about winter blizzards!!!!

The Bard

shakespeares certificate of marriage – There is actually a mystery surrounding Shakespeare and a crossed-out entry in the parish book days before his recorded marriage.  But, you’ll have to find that out elsewhere…

shakespeare translation for “hey, what’s up?” – “How now?”  He used it a lot.

goethe what is past is prologue – Shakespeare said it first!

past is prologue tattoo – Cool!

Call Me

götz ursula regensburg – Please come back! She’s my great-great grandmother and I really need to know more about her!

So there you have it!  The next edition of the What’s Past is Prologue search term carnival will include more bizarre, freakish, and unusual ways that bring me more traffic.  Until next time, I remain the Queen of Forgotten Unusual Facial Expressions and Dumb Mistake Cake Spelling Roulette.  [Note: My past crown titles include Queen and Super-Finder of Renegade Name-Labeled Regal Dog Portraits and Queen of Ugly Teady Beer Shakespearean Transvestite Marriage Photos. I bet you’re jealous now.]  

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